Original Research

Die regte en verantwoordelikhede van die homoseksuele persoon

J. M. Koos Vorster
In die Skriflig/In Luce Verbi | Vol 39, No 3 | a403 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ids.v39i3.403 | © 2005 J. M. Koos Vorster | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 31 July 2005 | Published: 31 July 2005

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J. M. Koos Vorster, Skool vir Kerkwetenskappe, Potchefstroomkampus, Noordwes Universiteit, South Africa

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Abstract

The rights and responsibilities of the homosexual person
Homosexual conduct is at the moment a very contentious issue in Christian Ethics in South Africa. The arguments in favour of a Christian ethical approval of homosexual relations, that were entertained in the seventies and eigthies of the previous century in Europe and the United States, are now on the agenda of the Dutch Reformed Churches in South Africa. The issue of possible official marriages between homosexual partners is also under consideration due to a judgement of the Court of Appeal in South Africa that a prohibition on same-sex marriages should be regarded as unconstitutional. This article investigates the arguments of the proponents of homosexual marriages by evaluating the Scriptural testimonies regarding homosexual conduct, and by formulating ethical norms applicable to this theme. The conclusion is that Scripture forbids homosexual conduct because it is considered as “contra naturam”. Therefore, the government and the church cannot condone homosexual conduct as well as same-sex marriages, because these relations are against the Biblical and constitutional value of human dignity. However, in spite of this principle both government and the church have an obligation to treat homosexual people with justice and love and to reject any form of homophobia.

Keywords

Homophobia; Homosexual Conduct; Homosexual Marriages; Homosexual Orientation; Homosexuality

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