Original Research - Special Collection: Impact of Reformed Theology

Spiritual intelligence can heal South Africa and Christianity has a major role to play

Elma Cornelius
In die Skriflig/In Luce Verbi | Vol 54, No 2 | a2546 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ids.v54i2.2546 | © 2020 Elma Cornelius | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 10 October 2019 | Published: 02 June 2020

About the author(s)

Elma Cornelius, Department of New Testament, Faculty of Theology, North-West University, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract


In South Africa (SA), we live in a sick society with drugs, alcohol abuse, rape, murder, shootings, theft, hijackings, gambling, pornography and so many more evils. What is wrong in SA? The author of this article argues that our problems in SA are a result of God, religion and religious scriptures being marginalised in society – a growing absence of spiritual intelligence. A lack of spiritual intelligence contributes to people’s abuse of power. This power abuse can be prevented once human race has been made aware of a supernatural power. This awareness, known as spiritual intelligence, thus seems to be an answer to our country’s problems. The author shows how the idea of spiritual intelligence has emerged into a modern debate and how the importance of spiritual intelligence has become known and debated among academics, psychologists, educators and business people. This article suggests that Christianity should take part in this debate and play a role in developing spiritual intelligence, in making human race aware of the supernatural power of the Christian God, in providing moral behaviour that can benefit the world by bringing religion back to society to prevent power abuse and to heal an out-of-control world.


Keywords

Spiritual intelligence; South Africa; Power abuse; Power of God; Christianity; Spirituele intelligensie; Suid-Afrika; Magsmisbruik; Die mag van God; Christendom

Metrics

Total abstract views: 582
Total article views: 1097


Crossref Citations

No related citations found.