Original Research

’n Diskoers oor eskatologie en promissioterapie by vroue na die verlies van ’n eggenoot

A. de Beer, J-A. van den Berg
In die Skriflig/In Luce Verbi | Vol 45, No 1 | a9 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/ids.v45i1.9 | © 2011 A. de Beer, J-A. van den Berg | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 22 June 2011 | Published: 22 June 2011

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A. de Beer,
J-A. van den Berg,

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Abstract

A discourse on eschatology and promissiotherapy with women after the loss of a husband

The central metaphor “discourse” is used in this research because it links with the narrative approach. This discourse is founded in practical theology and researched from postmodernity as paradigm and social constructionism as epistemological point of departure. The research is placed within the narrative hermeneutic approach and principles underlying participatory action research, as part of qualitative research methodology,are portrayed. The discourse is informed by using mechanisms of the narrative approach. Women, affected by the loss of a husband, constructed their stories during the pastoral therapeutic dialogue and their discourses on heaven are portrayed in verbatim conversations. The prospect of eschatology and promissiotherapy, to understand and interpret the experience of mourning and to facilitate hope and consolation, is explored.The concept eschatology emphasises the Christian aspect and deals with the actual and not just the ultimate. Promissiotherapy deals with the promises that are concerned with the beginning and the end or, in other words, the eschatology. The prospect of eschatology and promissiotherapy, to understand and interpret the experience of mourning and to facilitate hope and consolation, is explored. In this discussion the women’s portrayal of life hereafter and the role it can play to offer hope and consolation are illustrated.


Keywords

Eschatological; Promissiotherapy; Narrative Pastoral Care

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